Guitar popularity online

The first musical instruments that probably come to mind are guitar (bass, electric, or acoustic), piano, a drum set, or maybe even singing.

So many songs are now recorded in a studio with a drum, bass, guitar, singer, and/or piano for the song recording.

It might surprise you to learn that the guitar only really started to feature in songs in the last couple of hundred years. 

Teaching music used to centre around classical instruments (long before rock or jazz styles appeared) when more regular guitar lessons and playing started to appear in 16th century Spain.

Experience with widespread guitar lessons only only garnered a great base of students in the practice two hundred years later, around the period that Melbourne and Sydney started to boast thriving classical and contemporary music scenes.

There are many ways to learn the guitar
Online music lessons are surprisingly easy in the digital age | Source: MusicRadar

Flash forward 100 or so years again, and thanks to the digital age and video teaching capabilities, singing, bass, electric and acoustic guitar, drum, and piano practice and theory lessons with a qualified teachers, for beginner and advanced students alike, have struck a chord and become a common reality.

Learning guitar or getting theory lessons is easy online, though people may think there is a benefit to doing it in person.

The online sphere could surprise people with how musical it is, offering a great and fun experience, since video technology lets you refine your practice by watching your teacher, as well as connecting with other likeminded groups.

Whether you want to learn acoustic, bass, or electric, and regardless of what styles (jazz, rock, blues) you want in your musical education, there are plenty of teachers online for you.

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Madison
5
5 (11 reviews)
Madison
$35
/h
1st lesson free!
Gilson
5
5 (10 reviews)
Gilson
$60
/h
1st lesson free!
Daniel
5
5 (1 reviews)
Daniel
$40
/h
1st lesson free!
Kayler
5
5 (3 reviews)
Kayler
$60
/h
1st lesson free!
Mariella
5
5 (3 reviews)
Mariella
$20
/h
1st lesson free!
Mathieu
5
5 (9 reviews)
Mathieu
$30
/h
1st lesson free!
Martin
Martin
$35
/h
1st lesson free!
Declan
Declan
$60
/h
First Lesson Free>

The Difference Between Guitar Lessons Online and In-Person

To save hours trawling through local classified ads, students are likely to have a better experience looking for a place to refine their guitar and any complementary musical skills with an online teacher.

Playing experience isn't reduced in any capacity, as a teacher wouldn't necessarily need to touch your hands when strumming and plucking in an in-person lesson anyway - they're just there to make sure you're having fun and really feel the rhythm of the song you're on.

At this time of history, teaching focusses more on independent learningso the theory side of your musical practice and education can be done by you, and the teacher can still correct any issues you may be having via video.

To actually work out any theory based issues you may have with chords for instance, the teacher can also use the video function to show the best way to approach these by singing, showing on the piano, or their guitar, using various songs to contextualise.

In-person, the upside is that the learning can feel more personal, not to mention the acoustic benefit of being in the same room as your teacher when you shred chords.

 Beginners in particular would benefit from the years of experience of a teacher in a music school since they really need to feel free to play the music to get confident. 

For beginners (and also sometime for intermediate and advanced students), a free first session is often offered in a music school, so try this to see if it's what you need before choosing online or in-person lessons.

It's also crucial to think about what styles of guitar or music you're interested in - jazz, blues, classical, rock etc. 

This can really change the experience you have in your lessons, since both the theory and practice will change the amount of time you spend on certain elements.

Talk to your teacher or school about this to figure out how to broach this in your lessons, and what levels you want to reach in each.

Django Reinhardt is well loved by jazz guitar fans
For lovers of jazz guitar, Django Reinhardt is a giant | Source: Pinterest - Tom Marchand

Main Types of Guitar

Regardless of whether you can read music or not, you'll know what a guitar sounds like. You hear them - bass, acoustic, electric, jazz, classical, steel string, nylon string - in songs all the time, since it's one of the best instruments for contemporary music due to its versatility.

The principal types of guitar you'll hear people play in rock, jazz, or pop music are:

  • Acoustic
  • Bass
  • Electric

If you think classical music is best for you, or enjoy the idea of singing along to a song by yourself in your free time, an acoustic guitar will strike a chord with you.

Such a style of guitar also lends itself well to the rock experience because it is versatile and easily accessible to play.

It best suits a solo artist and singer since it doesn't have the resonance of an electric guitar, so you're free to combine singing into your songs. 

An acoustic guitar is often made of wood, and comes in various sizes, with a hollow interior, and 6 nylon or steel strings (E, B, G, D, A, E). 

A chord with nylon strings is best for for flamenco, jazz, or classical, whereas steel string chords sound best with folk, country, and rock styles.

Ask your teacher or school and they'll be able to advise you on the type and size of guitar to consider to achieve your goals.

The bass guitar is the most misunderstood of the guitars.

The role of the person on the bass is to enhance the rhythmic experience, along with the person playing the drum.

Bass guitars have a deep tone, and aren't usually the centrepiece of a band since singing along with one is hard, and you're less free to drive the melody.

The bass is part of the guitar family, but only has 4 strings (E, A, D, G) in steel, nickel, or an alloy of both. More strings can be added to a bass guitar to  increase its range however depending on its musical purpose in the ensemble at that time. The blend in the strings often adds a thumping like a drum to the music, giving it depth.

An electric guitar lesson with a teacher with years and years of experience is what you'll want to learn if you're wanting to become a rock star.

Students on the electric guitar will likely want to go beyond mastering the guitar, to being the best there is, combining singing and other musical skills to steal the show.

Learning the electric guitar won't add years to your learning experience, but it might surprise you to learn that it does take time even though it's less about being able to read music and understand theory, and more about practice and playing.

The playing style of this guitar focuses the sound of the strings (E, B, G, D, A, E, same as acoustic, but generally all steel).

This is a great one to learn online because you can use your tech skills to plug the guitar in and maybe record directly onto the computer, or in a video lesson with your teacher.

Typical lead guitars have 6 strings
Some typical types of guitar have six strings, but a bass usually has 4 | Source: Guitar World

Types of Online Guitar lessons

Private One-To-One Guitar Online Classes

Work out your desired lesson styles across the internet in order to specify what assistance you need in your theory, styles, and practice.

Superprof is one of the best platforms to find an online personal tutor since it's the place you have access to hundreds of qualified and vetted teachers with years and years of experience across them.

They specialise in different styles of music - classical, blues, jazz rock etc - and guitar types, and can also recommend the best class style for your if you're a complete beginner.

The one-one-one focus is really useful in helping you understand the complications of playing and balancing chord work with strumming, so the same goes if you're a more advanced student too, since you will need more attention on you given that your teacher only has one screen and you do too.

Online Group Guitar Lessons

Lessons online in a group are also a plausible option. You will still end up working together, and the teacher can explain the theory, and you'll easily be able to view materials via email.

It might seem counterintuitive, but microphones can always be turned on or off if you need to play together or solo.

The online group alternative might also be the most financially viable one since there are plenty of free instrument tutorials on Youtube that you can work on together in an independent learning style while the teacher focuses one on one with a certain student at a particular time. 

The caveat is that all students playing at once might be out of the question, since there will be inevitable connection issues and different microphone qualities across the class, which are not conducive to harmonious musicality.

Guitar is an instrument for all age groups
You can start learning guitar, bass, or ukulele at any age | Source: Normans.co.uk

So what are you waiting for? You're already in front of your computer right?

Get in touch with a Superprof guitar tutor for the range of styles today to kick start your musical journey!

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Nelson