Do you live in Adelaide? Are you hoping to become an actor and break into the world of film, TV or theatre? In this article you will find all the useful information you need to start your journey in the city of Adelaide, Australia, the best acting schools and of course, tips to connect with private tutors through Superprof.

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5 (12 reviews)
Emma
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5 (9 reviews)
Sally
$50
/h
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1st lesson free!
Marie t
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5 (2 reviews)
Marie t
$40
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Joelle
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Kim
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Bruna
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1st lesson free!
Lauren
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5 (5 reviews)
Lauren
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Joel
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Acting for Theatre, Film and TV

Some people have dreams of being on stage in a great theatre production, making it to places like Broadway and being praised for their moving theatricality. Others are more inclined to develop their skills in big blockbuster movies, famous TV shows or even become staples in the indie film scene.

Acting is an art that can go many different ways. There are lots of different schools and methods and ways to tackle interpretation. And truth be told, the way you learn will vary depending on whether you want to be a TV or film actor or a theatre actor.

Can you transform into your character when acting
What is the difference between theatre and film acting? Source: Pexels

While it is true that a lot of famous TV and film actors started their careers in theatre and that acting is acting, there are tiny details that create a difference between both methods. This difference is known in the acting community as 'screen vs stage'.

For an actor, knowledge of the difference in the environment, venue and script between theatre and film is crucial to becoming what some would call a double-threat.

We will tell you the main differences and subtleties between the both of them.

  • Voice and Diction: one of the main distinctions between stage and screen acting has to do with distance.
    • Stage: stage performers only have one shot to get the scene right which means that they need to have a solid voice and diction and know their lines perfectly. Some productions might not have the greatest equipment like mics or theatres with great acoustic so it is important to project your voice in the best possible way while on stage.
    • Screen: when it comes to screen, the dynamic between performers involves way less distance. With your acting partner only a couple of feet away, it almost feels like you are having a private conversation. You don't need to project your voice, over articulate or have perfect dictation. Also, since performers have more than one shot to get scenes right, they can play around with voice, boom mics, lapel mics and microphones on set. Finally, there is always the option of recording their voice in post-production.
  • Body Language: the key to body language is basing your expressions on the size of the frame that you will be performing for, be it a screen or a theatre.
    • Stage: when actors are in front of an audience, they need to convey their physical decisions across the theatre. Depending on the size of the venue, they might have to exaggerate their actions and facial expressions so that the people seated in the furthest most seats in the back can hear and see what is happening. Performing artists can't express sorrow with only tears in their eyes because only those in the front row will see it.
    • Screen: when acting for the camera, the actor needs to be careful not to use grand body language as they would on stage because, in a close-up or even medium shot, that would look extremely exaggerated and over the top.
  • Preparations: how many shots do you have to nail your performance? This determines the preparation you will need to do it correctly.
    • Stage: when performing for theatre actors spend tons of practice hours building up their characters' identities and peculiarities and spend much more hours remembering their lines. This happens because the performance happens in real time and they only have one opportunity to get it right. People forget their lines, miss their cues, lose props, set pieces fall apart, lighting cues are missed and sound malfunctions. Things always happen in live theatre. This is why these types of performers should be ready for anything and why improv classes are such good practice for them.
    • Screen: think about it, if a screen performer forgets a line, what happens? The director yells cut and another take starts rolling. This allows for more flexibility when it comes to memory and preparation. Nevertheless, the challenge with screen acting is that scenes are frequently shot out of order. An actor may have to cry their eyes out at a funeral in one scene immediately followed by being overly joyous about having just won the lottery. This is why they need to know their characters beyond the script in order to be able to adapt to the different situations and even curve balls thrown at them by the director.
  • Direction: there is a very big difference when it comes to directing a scene for theatre and film and it has to do with the final product that the audience gets.
    • Stage: to put it bluntly, theatre directors direct actors. This is because the final product that the audience gets is focused on the performers on stage. This is why is through this type of direction that many actors are truly taught how to act. They have had months of critiquing under a professional to ensure they execute their best performance possible. This is not the case in film.
    • Screen: when it comes to screen acting, film directors direct the scene, not the actors. Film shoots are pressed for time and time is money so they can't spend as much time rehearsing scenes and going through emotions with their actors as they would on theatre. Normally, a film director needs an actor who is fully capable of directing themselves, properly playing to the camera, staying within the frame boundaries, and not doing any unnecessary fidgeting or fumbling. The actor pretty much directs themselves on set when it comes to screen acting.

Do you know any other differences between both? Which one do you prefer? Keep reading to find great acting schools.

Do you want to take acting classes in Melbourne or start your drama courses in Brisbane?

Acting Schools in Adelaide

Do you want to be a movie actor
Adelaide has plenty of schools to learn from! Source: Pexels

Are you looking for acting classes in Adelaide? There are plenty of great options of academic courses and acting communities that you can look into.

Depending on the type of environment and acting that you want to learn, make sure that you do your research and understand how they work before enrolling!

  • Actors Ink: this is an acting agency that offers classes on the side. Their main focus is on actor representation for the professional actor, and they offer the service of in house casting and tuition. According to their website, 'the program at Actors Ink focuses on the development of specific skills and techniques required for both theatre and film.'
  • Adelaide Theatre Academy: this theatre focused academy will help you 'not only learn skills in dance, singing and drama. You will also learn to trust your own ideas, develop perseverance, empathise with others, work with peers to achieve a common goal and feel confident in your own ability.'
  • NIDA: located across Australia, the National Institute of Dramatic Art is focused on giving children, young people and adults in Adelaide the opportunity to engage in a variety of short courses to unlock their creative potential and build their confidence. They have both term classes and holiday classes for kids and short courses for adults.
  • Type Talent Acting Academy: this school offers classes for children and adults alike and for any level: from beginners, novices to professional actors. 'Our classes are perfect for those who wish to enter the entertainment industry, develop their skills and successfully perform in front of many people,' they state.
  • SA Casting: another casting agency that has the option for people to enrol in their school. The school offers acting classes at all levels, for all media and ages. Class times vary depending on age and style of programme. Prices range from $50 for a 2 hour workshop up to $535 for 4 hours once a week for 10 weeks.

Find the best acting courses in Perth!

Acting lessons Adelaide with Superprof

If you are not thrilled about the idea of group classes in a school setting, Superprof can also be a great option for you to find a private acting coach and start developing your skills.

Curious about the platform? Check out our offer, see the teachers' profiles and make sure you find the one that resonates best with you and what you expect to learn.

At the moment, the average hourly cost for acting classes in Adelaide is $39 dollars but this can vary depending on the profile and experience of your teacher.

We recommend you have a test class (which is often given for free by the teacher) to get to know the teacher before committing to acting lessons and, once you've found your match, start learning everything there is to know about the craft!

Look at acting classes in Sydney, if you're not based in Adelaide.

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Andrea